Posts tagged Pusha T
The Most Anticipated Projects of 2019
(Prince Williams/WireImage)

(Prince Williams/WireImage)

A new year brings a clean slate, and with that comes fresh new music. 2018 brought a doozy of releases; so much it was being debated that there was TOO MUCH new music on the streets. Still, fans are anticipating a bevy of new releases in 2019. Here’s the artists we’re anticipating to drop new projects to end the decade.

Schoolboy Q

It never surprises me that Top Dawg sets the tone each year, and this time around it’s Groovy Q’s turn to drop. Last we heard from him was back in 2016 with his sophomore album Blankface LP. He’s killed some features here and there, and Q was reported to be close to finishing his third major studio album before he pushed it back due to the sudden, unexpected death of his good friend Mac Miller.

Signs on Q’s Instagram point to him being ready to release some new heat, so we’re excited to hear what he has in store for us this time around.

Isaiah Rashad

Isaiah Rashad has been real quiet since the release of his sophomore album The Sun’s Tirade. Last August Top Dawg hinted at a few more albums on the way, leading to speculation a new project from Rashad was on the horizon. While we already know how Kendrick, Jay Rock, & SZA can roll, I’m real interested to see which direction is Zay is headed.

Dreamville - Revenge of the Dreamers 3

Following the Revenge of the Dreamers 3 sessions so far has been one of my favorite moments in the early stages of the year Watching the sessions from the outside-in via social media feels like an exclusive invite-only club with other artists, musicians and media members. Seeing the sessions unfold has been organically amazing to witness.

J. Cole - The Fall Off 

Cole teased The Fall Off during his KOD run. We haven’t heard much about its status lately, but Cole has appeared to be re-inspired, working in the studio more often and exploring different producers. It’s cool to see Cole expand in that way, and I’m anxious to see if it will play a part in creating his next album.

Future presents: The WZRD

2018 felt like a light year musically for Fewtch. He dropped four projects, including the curated soundtrack to Superfly, but his presence wasn’t necessarily felt last year. That all changes this weekend with the release of The WZRD.

Freddie Gibbs & Madlib - Bandana 

One of the more underrated rappers in the game, Freddie Gibbs dropped two projects in 2018: the Curren$y-collaborated Fetti and his project with Kenny Beatz, Freddie. For the last few months he’s been teasing his follow-up to 2014’s Piñata with Madlib - Bandana. Expect more of the same heat from Freddie in the new year.

21 Savage & Young Nudy

Both 21 Savage & Young Nudy were making their rounds in 2018 with their respective solo projects, Nudy’s Slime Ball 3 and I Was  > I Am from 21. Both projects helped solidify both of their positions in the Atlanta rap scene. The two announced a collaborative project at the end of last year and have dropped a single for the project, Since When.

Chance The Rapper

Aside from the features and some loosies given to us, we haven’t received a full blown project from Chicago’s friendly neighborhood rapper since 2016’s Coloring Book. Chance has a few expected projects in the works, including his own solo album and two collaborative albums: one with Childish Gambino and the other with Kanye West. He’s been very tight-lipped about his next project, so stay tuned.

Pusha T

I don’t have many details yet, but i’ve heard through the grapevines that Pusha T would be releasing an album this year. There’s not a lot of information regarding this but at this point, anything is possible with the president of GOOD Music. 

Album review: Anderson .Paak lets you into his eclectic world with "Oxnard"

Oxnard is the 19th most populated city in the entire state of California. Approximately two hours northwest of: El Segundo, where the transcendent Kamaal The Abstract left his wallet in a legendary tale; Compton, where the cerebral Andre Young recorded a seminal masterpiece titled The Chronic, and; Long Beach, where Calvin Broadus linked up with Young to create a definitive West Coast classic nearly 25 years ago to the day. It's also home to a multi-hyphenate musician by the name of Brandon Paak Anderson - a man working on a lasting legacy of his own.

His laid-back mannerisms embody the spirit of the Greater Los Angeles area that has the essence of summertime year-round. The artist formerly known as Breezy Lovejoy makes his performances on stage and in the studio seem effortless, but a tremendous amount of work was required on this difficult path to reach the crest of his profession. Even after all he's accomplished, he's not even close to his full potential; alike to the next evolution of music consumption after streaming, the listeners won't know what to expect next, but it could potentially shift the way we view this art form.

Seven years ago, he was homeless with a wife and child after unexpectedly being fired as a weed farmer. Today, the GRAMMY-nominated 32-year-old Anderson .Paak dropped an instant album of the year contender: Oxnard, the third (solo) studio album under his current moniker. The previous two are vastly different from each other but are important to the development of a style that can't be replicated. Venice (2014) was an ambitious electro-R&B project, mixed with guitar licks and trap sounds, had a few moments but as a whole, felt unfocused. However, 2016 yielded more fruitful results. At the top of the year, the arsenal of his creative genius was on full display with Malibu, featuring his close friends The Free Nationals. The band's steady yet lively instrumentation and unforced chemistry with Andy helped to congeal any loose pockets that plagued the clunky Venice. This allowed .Paak to settle into his signature groove by exploring and destroying conventional aspects of music by combining neo-soul, funk, rap, and jazz without sounding disheveled.

The results were a critically acclaimed album in a class of its own, unbothered with fitting a singular trend; rather, Anderson .Paak and The Free Nationals were inspired by various genres and smartly crafted their own vibe on Malibu. Bookended between soulful, show-stealing guest spots, a highly regarded, more "traditional" rhythm & blues performance as one-half of Nxworries further cemented .Paak as a bona fide star.

While decades of trial & error and a strong background in the church were integral to the process, the free spirit of Yes Lawd! was refined thanks in part to Dr. Dre. “You need that, because you’ll go crazy when you’re making these albums if you don’t have nobody to be your co-pilot,” said .Paak of Dre and his meticulous focus in the studio. The iconic producer-turned-mogul played the role of mentor as he's done for the past 30 years. A well documented, near-peerless industry track record like Dre’s gave .Paak a major co-sign. 16 years after the flawless 2001, Dre triumphantly returned in 2015 with Compton: a soundtrack to the summer box office hit Straight Outta Compton that was meant to showcase the rising talent from the West Coast. Nobody shined brighter on Compton than Anderson .Paak.

Three years later, fully formed as a dangerous versatile threat, he returns to the lab with The Doc to put the finishing touches on Oxnard.

“'We went in for a few more weeks and that’s when the bulk of the album actually got done,' .Paak says of the more than 10 new tracks that form the core of the record. 'And these were songs that I never thought I’d write.'"

The mission was to let the entertainment world know that he and his hometown weren't solely "LA-adjacent"; they are distinct entities worthy of more than being generalized with the rest of the mold. The cinematic feel of Oxnard reflects the rockstar life he's experienced since 2014. There's a larger-than-life boldness to this record, similar to blaxploitation era films from the '70s. The album opener The Chase featuring Kadhja Bonet, sounds like a crisp remake of a funky jam found on the Dolemite soundtrack. As he does throughout the hour-long project, .Paak vacillates here between a slick rap flow and a cool, easy, yet powerful croon. The meticulous nature of Dr. Dre's handprint is obvious in more ways than one. Relative to his previous releases, it wouldn't be out of line to say that Oxnard is Anderson .Paak's *rap* album; in that, he rhymes in a lyricist's prose for a large portion of his verses like the 9th Wonder-produced Saviers Road. The shit talking and confidence with the way he spits in on par, if not better, than a lot of rappers currently in the game.

However, it would be unfair to just categorize it as his *rap* album. It's a multi-dimensional walk down a vibrant landscape that only an engineer on the level of Dr. Dre could so expertly arrange. Oxnard, like .Paak, is genre-less. Smile/Petty featuring Sonya Elise and SiR balances smooth vocals and nasally raps over a mellow RnB tune before ending with strong, spiteful singing over heavy g-funk production. Tints is a fun groove of lead single with a Kendrick Lamar - who co-habits the space on his best behavior - as they deal with increased stardom ("Paparazzi wanna shoot ya, shoot ya, niggas dying for less here"..."I can't be flying down that 110 with a bad bitch in my whip, I need tints"). The first half of 6 Summers doesn't mesh with the stellar second half, but it's meant to be a satirical "holding a mirror to the goofy commander-in-cheeto" in the Oval Office. Cheeky Andy doesn't seek to be overtly political, but when necessary, he can make a statement on behalf of his people.

On Animals, a standout off Compton, he sings:

The police don't come around these parts
They tell me that we all a bunch of animals
The only time they wanna turn the cameras on
Is when we're fuckin' shit up, come on

The refrain for the second half of 6 Summers goes on to say:

This shit gon' bang for at least six summers
But ain't shit gon' change for at least three summers
They tryna kill a nigga faith, we need a little truth, brother
Pop-pop-pop goes the shooter
Reform, reform shoulda came sooner

Contributing to social commentary as an artist, whether heavy-handed or subtle, can never be understated with a growing platform such as his. "Ain't shit gon' change" right away, but with a concerted effort, change is possible; stating so on a project that's "gon' bang for at least six summers" is a good way to spread the message. Aside from .Paak's multi-faceted performance and expertly mixed production, the strength of Oxnard lie in the guest appearances from a star-studded lineup. The mean 808, guitar infused banger Brother's Keeper, featuring the legal malice of Pusha-T (Am I my brother's keeper, they still asking 'bout the duo // Applaud his finding salvation, But I'm still rhyming 'bout the you know); Trippy with J. Cole - a calm soothing ballad dedicated to the love of their lives; Sweet Chick featuring the great, colorful, and soulful harmonics of BJ the Chicago Kid. On Anywhere, 25 years after the creation of Doggystyle, Dre & Snoop, still, in rare form as a pairing, reconnect to help give .Paak a fresh, relaxed melodic West Coast sound. On Cheers, the rapper who lost his wallet in El Segundo 18 years prior, talks about a different loss. Q-Tip (RIP Phife) and Anderson (RIP Mac Miller) share sentiments of losing close friends and collaborators, but choose to treat it as a reflective celebration of life. The result is a vibrant Dre & Tip production brought to life with upbeat percussion and synthesizers.

Venice to Compton to Malibu to Oxnard is a modern journey unlike anyone else's in popular music today. Each project has a distinct standalone presence, using previous experiences to carefully build towards this exact moment in 2018. An artist on the precipice of becoming a mega-star is learning to become more of himself. It can't be a coincidence how the path of the location first trended towards the actual city of Los Angeles then rerouted back to the place of his birth. Oxnard is an ode to and a return presentation to his hometown to share life experiences after traveling the globe in the limelight. It's evident that he grew as a lyricist, songwriter, composer, and musician as a whole...but we're nowhere close to the peak of his abilities. Oxnard, if only a glimpse, is a step in the direction of his full potential. It's a project that'll appreciate with time.

From CRWN, a sit-down conversation with Tidal:

Elliot Wilson: you have a wide musical pallet...with your classification of music, sometimes people don't necessarily know if they should put you in the idea of what RnB is...do you hate those classifications and feel like it's just music?

"I think that people need to just first listen to the music. Like stop tryna put it and compare it and immediately say it's like this or it's like this. A lot of people aren't even listening to the music, on God. Like they not really digesting the music; they're just like one time through and they're eager to compare it...just listen! I just leave it up to the people...my job is just to make it and make sure it's honest."

He doesn't fit a particular genre because he's his own genre. He’s Anderson .Paak.

Ball Don't Lie - "Jimmy Butler = Buddy Ass"

The three-man crew is back together for a preview of the new NBA season, a recap of week 6 and to chat about the continued back-and-forth between Drake and Pusha T.

Topics:

Sound-off
NBA opening night
Things we’re looking forward to this season
Jimmy Butler/T’Wolves drama
Week 6 NFL review
Brady/Rodgers performance
Heated Saquon Barkley v. QB debate
Do you believe in Mahomes & the Chiefs?
Are the Jags D overrated?
Week 7 predictions
Drake/Pusha T interviews
Goofy Mog of the Week
Shoutouts

Become a patron of The Barber's Chair on Patreon! $5 a month will get you a thank you on Ball Don't Lie and guarantees you access to exclusive premium content from The Barber's Chair when it becomes available!
patreon.com/barberschairnet

Grab your official Barber's Chair merch as well!
teespring.com/stores/the-barbers-chair

Follow Scott: @Scott_CEOofSUH
Follow Pierce: @HennyOmega
Follow Joe: @Flowsandolini

M.I.D. Summer: Three takeaways from the Wyoming sessions

Chaos begets excellence in the strange world of Kanye West. At least it used to. It's similar to T'Challa's advanced body armor: the more negative blows Ye's accumulates, the stronger his kinetic energy becomes when working on the latest composition. History has proven that he thrives in a chaotic environment, which is often self-made by spewing outlandish statements or ranting on stage psychotically.

Source: Chris Rock

Source: Chris Rock

We've seen this narrative play out several times over his solo career. It's like a Sixth Sense for Kanye loyalists: he just made an ass out of himself publicly...but that means he's about to drop some fire for the summer. From the Mike Myers headjerk (once) to the Taylor Swift incident (twice) to the public scolding of media personalities (the keyboard need an infinity sign), Kanye has never shied away from controversy. It's the catalyst that drives the conceptually forward-thinking music creative that's within. Until 2018.

This method showed signs of deterioration during the manic frenzy that was The Life of Pablo era in 2016. Although it was widely considered to be a lower-tier release in his catalog, TLOP provided flashes of brilliance like the chilling and cinematic "Ultralight Beam" that reminded many fans why they put up with Kanye's bullshit outside of the music.

Even the shaky rollout that was all-but-off-the-rails culminated with one of 2016's biggest events in entertainment: Yeezy Season 3, a runway show that doubled as an album release party for 18,000 people at a sold out Madison Square Garden. Lasting memories were created there while his ignorance off the boards was brushed to the side (but not forgotten).

We're a little more than a month removed from the last release from the Wyoming Sessions and it's becoming increasingly obvious that the self-proclaimed genius had failed with his experiment in the grandest of ways. "Failed" because of the collective lack of care for the final execution of the projects. "In the grandest of ways," because of the collateral damage he caused along the way (see: "Slavery was a Choice" and M*GA/Dragon Energy).

When he announced the lineup of five consecutive weeks of new releases - Pusha-T, himself, Kid Cudi & himself, Nas, and Teyana Taylor - while primarily handling the production as well, it was safe to assume that G.O.O.D. Fridays were finally back.

Nope.

Compared to Hawaii and the glorious run in 2010 resulting in a classic album, the Wyoming Sessions proved to be weird cousin Arnie from Hey Arnold: recognizable, but awkwardly shaped and dull. Aside from the whole Drake fiasco, it was hardly a Cruel Summer from the vaunted G.O.O.D. Music camp. But it wasn't a complete trainwreck. 

Here are a few thoughts I had about the "experience" overall:


1. Pusha-T was the Trojan Horse of the experiment

DAYTONA had to work. As the pace car for this five-week circuit, it had to be damn near perfect; to many, it lived up to expectations. If the long-awaited true follow-up to My Name is My Name was anything less than stellar, the already mild anticipation for the rest of Wyoming would have dried up even quicker. Serving up the purest brick of Peruvian white, the G.O.O.D. Music President delivered his best solo project to date with DAYTONA; raw, cut with no filler whatsoever.

Ye & Mike Dean really shined with the minimalist production paired with gritty sampling to create a menacing atmosphere. His delivery is grimy, yet relaxed and confident like it hasn't aged a day since Lord Willin'. Most importantly, there were no stale bars or wasted lines from Push; similar to a technical boxer accruing points over the course of a fight to earn the decision in the 12th round, as opposed to the knockout artist getting winded by the fifth bell. For an added measure to retain maximum attention towards Wyoming, there was "The Story of Adidion."

Terrance and Aubrey have traded their fair share of subs in years prior (essentially over a BAPE hoody), but after the scope of the battle was lined up with "Infrared," Drake quickly responded with a clip that has presumably in the chamber for a while, saved for a moment like this. "Aight, bet," said the Virginia Beach native and proceeded to expose a lot of shit about Drizzy that the public wasn't privy to (sidenote: you're allowed to enjoy Scorpion AND still think "YOU ARE HIDING A CHILD" is hilarious too. Let these jokes breathe).

There's an unconfirmed report from a credible source that Ye learned about Aubrey's now-public son when he brought Drake to Wyoming for a writing session. If this is true, it's very possible that Kanye gave this ammo to Pusha-T, strategically use him as a conduit to create a huge controversy for maximum attention. If so, it might be time for Kanye to reevaluate his promotional tactics. The numbers and metrics may have inflated because of it, but is a (supposed) shady move like worth a loss of credibility, Ye?

2. Nas and Teyana Taylor deserved better, especially Teyana

Teyana Taylor signed to G.O.O.D Music in 2012. Since then, she's had 1. a few placements on Cruel Summer; 2. released VII, a solid, but under the radar studio album; 3. an incredibly skilled and sexy performance for the "FADE" music video. Limited as they may be, she has shined with every opportunity given to her and has been patiently waiting to show the world why she should be considered a true force in RnB. An album executively produced by arguably one of the most important producers since the start of the millennium was supposed to launch her to that height.

Keep That Same Energy deserved a traditional and proper rollout, complete with lead singles and visuals to match. Hell, at the very least, she deserved a completed album. Waking up to texts from friends, the day after it was supposed to drop (!), when it didn't, to realize it wasn't the final version you thought was coming out (!!), should never be the way to first hear your "completed" album. Teyana sang her ass off on KTSE, but the production and final mixing arrangment felt incomplete.

And with Nas, I don't know. Maybe Escobar Season was experiencing Climate Change 'cause this ain't it, chief. And he knows that. The album felt rushed and disjointed, as if the lyrics were recorded acapella and blindly matched to beat stems at the last minute, without any final input from the artist.

On the process of recording with Kanye. “Wyoming was weird.” 😅 pic.twitter.com/5dX9cv5auB

— Eric Diep (@E_Diep) July 27, 2018

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

When I heard the news about NASIR, I was expecting seven "We Major" level tracks.  That bar was set way too high. But it looks like a more carefully thought out, traditional hip-hop project from Nas is coming soon:

And another Nas album on the way. He has been in with Swizz Beatz and RZA. pic.twitter.com/E9uaZLvi0o

— Eric Diep (@E_Diep) July 27, 2018

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

3. Rev. Ty Dolla $ign and 070 Shake are co-MVPs of the Wyoming Summer League

ty-dolla-sign.jpg

TY Dolla Sign

The five TY$ tracks every new fan needs to know

Not much to say about Ty; in 2018 he has definitively cemented his status as an RnB star with his incredible run over the past three years, a run that started with Free TC. Many jokes flew about the mediocre nature and output of the Wyoming Sessions, but none of these shots landed in the vicinity of $.  Say what you will about Kanye, but he's a veteran at utilizing his guest features as elements on instrumentals in bold and sublime ways. Ty Dolla $ign's harmonizing and gospel-esq vocals stole the show on "All Mine," "3Way," "Wouldn't Leave," and "Freeee (Ghost Town Pt 2)." 

070 Shake, however, didn't have an established base prior to the Wyoming experience. Being a relatively unknown artist, the New Jersey native had the most to prove, and, when called upon, brushed off that chip on her shoulder with ease. She undoubtly made a mark with a distinct and haunting vocal presence on "Santeria," "Ghost Town," and "Not For Radio,"; songs that feature Push, Ye, Cudi, PARTYNEXTDOOR, Nas, and Diddy. Not a terrible way to start off one's career. If she's not shelved as a background artist only brought out for experiments (*coughs* Teyana deserved better), then the sky's the limit for Shake's future with G.O.O.D.


Kids See Ghosts did take us a little over a year-and-a-half to just get it tight and where we wanted it to be... Months went by, and we just kept working on it and chiseling away at it. It was funny to us when people were talking about how the album was rushed or last-minute. I knew what it took. I was there the whole time. - Kid Cudi for Billboard; July 2018

Many consider Kids See Ghosts as the most well-round project to come out Wyoming. Stripped of excessive arrogance, Kanye and Cudi (whose hums were in peak form) created a powerful 7-track diary of sorts, detailing their bouts with depression and mental health. The primary influencers of Mike Dean, Plain Pat, and Dot the Genius, as they've done on previous work (i.e. 808s & Heartbreak, Man on the Moon) made the duo sound as sharp as they've been in the past decade. Thoughts can be birthed quickly and finalizing the product could take 7 days, but that kind of focus to make sure that the arrangement of sounds and performance from the lyricists/singers normally isn't overnight.

It can work for some, but it's not for everyone. Aside from Kanye playing active defense against the opening track's attempt at not sounding like a trainwreck, KSG had a sense of completeness that ye (lyrics scrapped and recreated in 8 days), KTSE, and NASIR did not have.

Music opinions are subjective and number ratings are arbitrary but if I'd have to rate the Wyoming experience, it'd be 2.5/5; the 2 representing the successes (DAYTONA and KSG), the .5 representing the half-baked ideas of the other 3.

Each collection arguably had at least one song with replay value beyond 1-listen:

1. Push's grizzly and boastful "The Games We Play" (No jewelry on, but you richer than everybody // You laugh a little louder, the DJ say your name a little prouder //And we don't need a globe to show you the world is ours);

2. "No Mistakes" featuring Charlie Wilson (I'm definitely gonna need an hour-long Kanye-less version that loops Uncle Charlie's chorus like what someone did with the horns from SpottieOttieDopaliscious);

3. A therapeutic Cudi glides on "Reborn" which featured a Kanye that suddenly remembered how to rap his ass off on a Graduation era type of feel for the overall song;

4. "Bonjour" feels like the perfect soundtrack to sail along the Amalfi Coast to, boo'd up, with a never-ending glass of expensive alcohol in hand, without a care in the world. NASIR deserved 6 more of these.

5. From the raps and to boldly sang vocals, Teyana bodied her performance on the sample-driven and orchestral "Rose in Harlem." KTSE suffered the most from "demoitis," but she, as best as she could, rose to shine from the fractured cement better known as the Wyoming Sessions;

Ball Don't Lie ep. 20 - The Season Finale ft. @Al_Patron

It's the season finale of Ball Don't Lie! Author & creator Al Patron (@Al_Patron) joins the crew to wrap up the NBA season. Are the Warriors a dynasty, and how long will their window be open for? We also talk about the ridiculous of LeBron James stans and has the GOAT debate finally been laid to rest? Also what's our overall grade on the NBA, did Drake catch the biggest L in Hip-Hop history, and our final Goofy Mogs of the season.

Follow Scott: @Scott_CEOofSUH
Follow Joe: @FlowsAndolini
Follow Pierce: @HennyOmega