Posts tagged Los Angeles
Album review: Anderson .Paak lets you into his eclectic world with "Oxnard"

Oxnard is the 19th most populated city in the entire state of California. Approximately two hours northwest of: El Segundo, where the transcendent Kamaal The Abstract left his wallet in a legendary tale; Compton, where the cerebral Andre Young recorded a seminal masterpiece titled The Chronic, and; Long Beach, where Calvin Broadus linked up with Young to create a definitive West Coast classic nearly 25 years ago to the day. It's also home to a multi-hyphenate musician by the name of Brandon Paak Anderson - a man working on a lasting legacy of his own.

His laid-back mannerisms embody the spirit of the Greater Los Angeles area that has the essence of summertime year-round. The artist formerly known as Breezy Lovejoy makes his performances on stage and in the studio seem effortless, but a tremendous amount of work was required on this difficult path to reach the crest of his profession. Even after all he's accomplished, he's not even close to his full potential; alike to the next evolution of music consumption after streaming, the listeners won't know what to expect next, but it could potentially shift the way we view this art form.

Seven years ago, he was homeless with a wife and child after unexpectedly being fired as a weed farmer. Today, the GRAMMY-nominated 32-year-old Anderson .Paak dropped an instant album of the year contender: Oxnard, the third (solo) studio album under his current moniker. The previous two are vastly different from each other but are important to the development of a style that can't be replicated. Venice (2014) was an ambitious electro-R&B project, mixed with guitar licks and trap sounds, had a few moments but as a whole, felt unfocused. However, 2016 yielded more fruitful results. At the top of the year, the arsenal of his creative genius was on full display with Malibu, featuring his close friends The Free Nationals. The band's steady yet lively instrumentation and unforced chemistry with Andy helped to congeal any loose pockets that plagued the clunky Venice. This allowed .Paak to settle into his signature groove by exploring and destroying conventional aspects of music by combining neo-soul, funk, rap, and jazz without sounding disheveled.

The results were a critically acclaimed album in a class of its own, unbothered with fitting a singular trend; rather, Anderson .Paak and The Free Nationals were inspired by various genres and smartly crafted their own vibe on Malibu. Bookended between soulful, show-stealing guest spots, a highly regarded, more "traditional" rhythm & blues performance as one-half of Nxworries further cemented .Paak as a bona fide star.

While decades of trial & error and a strong background in the church were integral to the process, the free spirit of Yes Lawd! was refined thanks in part to Dr. Dre. “You need that, because you’ll go crazy when you’re making these albums if you don’t have nobody to be your co-pilot,” said .Paak of Dre and his meticulous focus in the studio. The iconic producer-turned-mogul played the role of mentor as he's done for the past 30 years. A well documented, near-peerless industry track record like Dre’s gave .Paak a major co-sign. 16 years after the flawless 2001, Dre triumphantly returned in 2015 with Compton: a soundtrack to the summer box office hit Straight Outta Compton that was meant to showcase the rising talent from the West Coast. Nobody shined brighter on Compton than Anderson .Paak.

Three years later, fully formed as a dangerous versatile threat, he returns to the lab with The Doc to put the finishing touches on Oxnard.

“'We went in for a few more weeks and that’s when the bulk of the album actually got done,' .Paak says of the more than 10 new tracks that form the core of the record. 'And these were songs that I never thought I’d write.'"

The mission was to let the entertainment world know that he and his hometown weren't solely "LA-adjacent"; they are distinct entities worthy of more than being generalized with the rest of the mold. The cinematic feel of Oxnard reflects the rockstar life he's experienced since 2014. There's a larger-than-life boldness to this record, similar to blaxploitation era films from the '70s. The album opener The Chase featuring Kadhja Bonet, sounds like a crisp remake of a funky jam found on the Dolemite soundtrack. As he does throughout the hour-long project, .Paak vacillates here between a slick rap flow and a cool, easy, yet powerful croon. The meticulous nature of Dr. Dre's handprint is obvious in more ways than one. Relative to his previous releases, it wouldn't be out of line to say that Oxnard is Anderson .Paak's *rap* album; in that, he rhymes in a lyricist's prose for a large portion of his verses like the 9th Wonder-produced Saviers Road. The shit talking and confidence with the way he spits in on par, if not better, than a lot of rappers currently in the game.

However, it would be unfair to just categorize it as his *rap* album. It's a multi-dimensional walk down a vibrant landscape that only an engineer on the level of Dr. Dre could so expertly arrange. Oxnard, like .Paak, is genre-less. Smile/Petty featuring Sonya Elise and SiR balances smooth vocals and nasally raps over a mellow RnB tune before ending with strong, spiteful singing over heavy g-funk production. Tints is a fun groove of lead single with a Kendrick Lamar - who co-habits the space on his best behavior - as they deal with increased stardom ("Paparazzi wanna shoot ya, shoot ya, niggas dying for less here"..."I can't be flying down that 110 with a bad bitch in my whip, I need tints"). The first half of 6 Summers doesn't mesh with the stellar second half, but it's meant to be a satirical "holding a mirror to the goofy commander-in-cheeto" in the Oval Office. Cheeky Andy doesn't seek to be overtly political, but when necessary, he can make a statement on behalf of his people.

On Animals, a standout off Compton, he sings:

The police don't come around these parts
They tell me that we all a bunch of animals
The only time they wanna turn the cameras on
Is when we're fuckin' shit up, come on

The refrain for the second half of 6 Summers goes on to say:

This shit gon' bang for at least six summers
But ain't shit gon' change for at least three summers
They tryna kill a nigga faith, we need a little truth, brother
Pop-pop-pop goes the shooter
Reform, reform shoulda came sooner

Contributing to social commentary as an artist, whether heavy-handed or subtle, can never be understated with a growing platform such as his. "Ain't shit gon' change" right away, but with a concerted effort, change is possible; stating so on a project that's "gon' bang for at least six summers" is a good way to spread the message. Aside from .Paak's multi-faceted performance and expertly mixed production, the strength of Oxnard lie in the guest appearances from a star-studded lineup. The mean 808, guitar infused banger Brother's Keeper, featuring the legal malice of Pusha-T (Am I my brother's keeper, they still asking 'bout the duo // Applaud his finding salvation, But I'm still rhyming 'bout the you know); Trippy with J. Cole - a calm soothing ballad dedicated to the love of their lives; Sweet Chick featuring the great, colorful, and soulful harmonics of BJ the Chicago Kid. On Anywhere, 25 years after the creation of Doggystyle, Dre & Snoop, still, in rare form as a pairing, reconnect to help give .Paak a fresh, relaxed melodic West Coast sound. On Cheers, the rapper who lost his wallet in El Segundo 18 years prior, talks about a different loss. Q-Tip (RIP Phife) and Anderson (RIP Mac Miller) share sentiments of losing close friends and collaborators, but choose to treat it as a reflective celebration of life. The result is a vibrant Dre & Tip production brought to life with upbeat percussion and synthesizers.

Venice to Compton to Malibu to Oxnard is a modern journey unlike anyone else's in popular music today. Each project has a distinct standalone presence, using previous experiences to carefully build towards this exact moment in 2018. An artist on the precipice of becoming a mega-star is learning to become more of himself. It can't be a coincidence how the path of the location first trended towards the actual city of Los Angeles then rerouted back to the place of his birth. Oxnard is an ode to and a return presentation to his hometown to share life experiences after traveling the globe in the limelight. It's evident that he grew as a lyricist, songwriter, composer, and musician as a whole...but we're nowhere close to the peak of his abilities. Oxnard, if only a glimpse, is a step in the direction of his full potential. It's a project that'll appreciate with time.

From CRWN, a sit-down conversation with Tidal:

Elliot Wilson: you have a wide musical pallet...with your classification of music, sometimes people don't necessarily know if they should put you in the idea of what RnB is...do you hate those classifications and feel like it's just music?

"I think that people need to just first listen to the music. Like stop tryna put it and compare it and immediately say it's like this or it's like this. A lot of people aren't even listening to the music, on God. Like they not really digesting the music; they're just like one time through and they're eager to compare it...just listen! I just leave it up to the people...my job is just to make it and make sure it's honest."

He doesn't fit a particular genre because he's his own genre. He’s Anderson .Paak.

The Internet, Buddy, and the Pursuit of Timelessness
Columbia Records

Columbia Records

RCA Records

RCA Records

“I got inspired by what she was talking about, and that night I did the drum beat and piano part for ‘Back to Black' and put tons of reverb on the tambourine. She’s deceivingly nonchalant, and when I played it for her the next day, she said, ‘It’s wicked,’ but I couldn’t tell if she meant it. Then she was like, ‘This is what I want my album to sound like.’

She would come in every day and play me songs on the acoustic guitar, and we’d try different arrangements to find something that felt authentic. The reason everyone goes back to those Motown records is that there were amazing musicians playing together in a room, and that’s what we tried to do.” - DJ/Producer Mark Ronson on creating the classic album Back to Black by Amy Winehouse

We are living in the most prolific time in music history, in terms of output; which is great because it offers fans a wide selection of new material to listen to from their current and new favorite artists. It's also disorienting for avid fanatics; it feels like a chore to keep up with the latest releases on a weekly basis. A project could receive critical and universal praise, only to be shuffled into the ether and forgotten about merely weeks later. Something like the Kendrick and TDE-curated Black Panther OST are a distant memory six months later.

With the rapid pace of material being produced daily (and with social media playing a role as an accelerant), six weeks ago might as well be six months ago in this current climate. There's an argument to be had about whether or not an artist should excessively drop multiple projects (3-4 or more) in the same calendar year. Experts like Curren$y and Future are revered for such a tactic because they meet the standards of what their loyal fan base approves of; at the very least, a handful of tracks can be taken away for high replay value beyond the life of "opening weekend."

It begs the question, though: is a compilation of greatest hits, in the long run, more valuable and more memorable than a discography filled with individual bodies of work with the most cohesion from front to back? What trumps all is having a bold authenticity to your craft. Far too often many artists on the urban scene catch the most popular wave, with the hopes of hitting a crest and ride it until the crash into the shore. We all hear it. Certain flows, cadences, vocal effects, drum patterns, hi-hat tempo, rhyme schemes, etc. get recycled into mediocrity. It's reheated microwave shit. It's digestible, but the quality is noticeably poorer. 

Important pioneers like Chicago's laidback rapper Valee has created a new style that's catchy and infectious in the best way possible. His "Ijustwokeupgaudyrapsthatflowlikerunonsentences" is already getting bitten by other rappers. Like his overall demeanor in his raps and interviews, he's not worried about it.

"I never get the time to get mad [about other rappers stealing this flow] because I'm so happy that they didn't do it right...you're so big [popular, well-known]...but you can't do something right" - Valee

Separating yourself from the crowd with authenticity and being distinctly unique has the best chance of success beyond the life of a current wave. In this fast-paced digital age of new music, The Internet and Buddy slowed things way down with their latest efforts, Hive Mind, and Harlan & Alondra, respectively. These California natives took the scenic route, via different paths, to their most mature and complete sounding records to date.


It's only been three weeks since the release date, but Harlan & Alondra already sounds nostalgic.  The foundation of this soundtrack, provided by Los Angeles residents Mike & Keys (Nipsey Hussle, Dom Kennedy, Casey Veggies), DJ Khalil, Terrance Martin, and Scoop DeVille among others, helped create an atmosphere that felt true to the region they were raised in. Without sounding forced, the production could easily replace the scores to Menace II Society or Boyz in the Hood and it wouldn't sound foreign or out of place. Sonically, Harlan & Alondra is an ode to its predecessors like Dr. Dre's The Chronic, DJ Quik's Way 2 Fonky, and Doggystyle by Snoop, who makes an energetic and youthful cameo on the groovy "The Blue." Soulful and g-funk-inspired, Buddy doesn't forget the roots that influenced him musically growing up in Compton, CA.

Despite being only 24 years old, Buddy has more than half a decade under his belt in this industry. As he raps on the introspective Find Me 2, "the last nigga signed to Star Trak" has had connections with Pharrell since the early 2010s, and they "still keep in contact," (he co-produced the final track on the album, Shine). Having that experience lends to the composure he displays throughout the album while talking about his trials and tribulations with slick raps and soulful crooning. Growth with his personal development from a reckless youth to a productive young adult is evident throughout this 12-track project. The album's peak, Trouble on Central shows Buddy's range as he melodically raps, bops and sings about his past situation and how he dreamed of something outside the view of his hood.

Just so good at being in trouble
Spending my days out in the ghetto
Papa say that I need to be careful

Heard a nigga just got popped at the Arco
Pros on the hoes stroll, junkies on narcos
Long Beach, Compton, Watts to South Central
Damn, I just can't wait 'til I get home (shit)
That's when a cop had pulled me over

“I feel relieved,” he says. “It’s like taking a shit. I had it in me for so long and now it’s just out into the world, just flushed.”

Buddy has crude humor about his debut album, which was nine years in the making, but judging by how well put together it was, one can tell how seriously he took this project. From the aggressively hype and proud Black featuring ASAP Ferg, to the cool, breezy, and light Hey Up There featuring Rev. Ty Dolla $ign, Buddy's range as a captivating musician is on full display. Named after the cross-street he grew up on, Harlan & Alondra is extremely personal to Buddy, both lyrically true and sonically native to his home environment.


Hive Mind, as of December 2017, was 95% finished, yet it only came out on July 20th, 2018. The hype was plenty, but the crew wasn't bothered by that pressure. It was fine-tuned to the highest of qualities. There's a certain maturity that comes with independence; branching out to do solo projects definitely contributed to their growth as a group. The opening track Come Together literally does that, as if it's a collective "oh what's good?" to the homies you haven't seen in a while. Every single element of the band is audible on this airy song, sounding sharper than ever.

I feel like this is on a higher echelon than Ego Death. I love Ego Death, that was a great record, but I know this one is a step up." - Steve Lacy

It's incredibly grown. Like, if you get passed the aux cord at your family's annual cookout, mixed with younger cousins and great-grandparents, this album is a safe medium that'll be impressionable to both crowds. Funk, soul, jazz, RnB, and electronic music are blended together for a groove-filled entertaining mix from start to finish. Syd hang-glides as a vocalist and constantly shows her versatility. On Stay the Night for example, her verses are delivered as relaxed jabs right before she hits a breathy stride into the bridge. One of the major standouts, the somber It Gets Better (With Time) evokes strong emotions from her vocals alone.

The lyrics are even more of gut punch:

Is something wrong?
'Cause you seem mighty low
Tell me what's going on
Probably been there before
Sit up and fix your face
You see me, I'm okay
We ain't got time today
Throw on your darker shades and
Smile for the camera

Balance is important; songs like the bass and percussion-driven Steve & Syd duet Roll (Burbank Funk) and the light-hearted upbeat groove of La Di Da provide just that. Girl chasing, love makin', heartbreak, self-care are universal themes in not only soul and RnB, but life in general. The Internet connected on these from a maturely confident point of view.

Staying true to self is something that'll never go out of style. Why be a copycat in an increasingly artificial world? Eventually, hit chasing is bound to lead to fatigue and it's even worse when it's not legitimate. It's not sustainable long term.

In the quote at the start of the piece, Amy Winehouse and Mark Ronson were aiming to create something authentic with lasting effects and used the Motown era as an example. He wasn't equating the two directly (I hope) but was showing how important it was to take the time to make the best possible thing as best as they can.

Slowing down the pace to focus on the long-term isn't always a bad idea. Even if wide-spread love isn't immediately shown, Harlan & Alondra and Hive Mind are two bodies of work that'll live beyond 2018. If done correctly, the culture will always accept and respect, futuristic throwbacks rooted in authenticity. The Internet and Buddy did just that.

Nipsey Hussle 'Victory Lap' Review
@NipseyHussle

@NipseyHussle

Atlanta, LA, & Chicago are my personal top three cities that have been running hip-hop since the 2000s; from the sonic sounds to the cultural impact including style of attire, lingo, swag, impact, & influence. Each city has had their shining moments throughout the 2000s with Atlanta leading the scoreboard. Chicago had it’s legendary moment with the introduction of Drill music to the the world in 2012.

Recently after careful review and consideration of the last 2-3 years, it’s safe to conclude that the West Coast rap scene has the best quality music right now. This isn’t to take away from the New West movement that took place back in the early-mid 2000s right around the time rapper Game dropped The Documentary. But Im loving today’s West Coast music coming from YG, Ty Dolla Sign, RJ, AD, & lets not forget the current king of the West and his label, Top Dawg Entertainment, which also happens to be the best team in hip-hop right now. But among all of these current LA greats lies one whom we’ve all been anticipating for this year in 2018: Nipsey Hussle.

Neighborhood Nip had announced his debut album Victory Lap back in 2013 after releasing his acclaimed mixtape with DJ Drama titled Crenshaw. Between releasing projects in between time while dealing with constant pushback resulting in the delay of the album, it was certain that Victory Lap was Detox status. But low and behold, Nipsey decided to drop his first single Rap Niggas on us. Not only did he drop his single but he actually gave us a release date for his debut. Talk about a double Whammy.

Nip continued to drop his singles, “Last Time That I Checc’d” with YG and “Dedication with Kendrick Lamar.He also dropped Been Down with Swizz Beatz, however it didn’t make it on the album tracklist. Each track that released was nothing short of amazing.It was refreshing to hear the direction Nipsey was going in for his debut album. All it did was heighten our expectations more. The album ended up being everything that we imagined when it officially released on February 16th.

According to Nipsey, the theme of Victory Lap is the collection of his significant life stories that shaped his existence and  overall meaning of the album, his brand and what he stands for as a entrepreneur.

It’s tough to really sit back and pick which favorite tracks stand out the most because just when you think you’ve found those important life gems necessary on cuts like Dedication, you let the album play and hear Blue Laces 2, Hussle & Motivate, & Status Symbol 3. All of sudden you’re motivated all over again and are ready to get back out there and get back on your grind. Dedication with Kendrick is one of my favorite tracks on the album. When I listen to that record, it truly sets the tone for what the entire album stands for. Everytime I hear the hook, I get the chills and reminder to keep continuing to “step my shit up” in life. Not to mention, Kendrick blessing us again with another fire feature, where he makes mention of a conversation him & Nipsey had with Top and Snoop during the 2017 biopic premier of All Eyez on Me.

Hussle & Motivate is another favorite of mines off the album, from the Annie sample flip to the cash money shit talk that will drive you and make you question what you doing with your life. This is a record where you need to play this either when you first wake up in the morning or when you’re on your way to work.

On his recent Breakfast Club interview, Nip said he was able to clear the Annie sample through Jay-Z and found out that back when Jay originally cleared the sample for his song, Hard Knock Life, he negotiated a deal where every rapper after him can use that sample as well. Hearing him tell that story made me appreciate the record more and reminded me why Jay-Z is who he is today: the greatest of all time. Hov did that so hopefully you won’t have to go through that.

Not only does this album promote the message of entrepreneurship, success,& being self-made, but also contains albums cuts like Status Symbol 3, Keys to the City 2, & Succa Proof that bang when you’re in the whip. Right now, Victory Lap is the best Rap album of 2018. Granted that we still have a long year ahead, It really took Nipsey 5 years in the making to create this incredible body of art and Im confident that not only its going to stay in rotation all 2018 but is going to age very well in the long run. Long live the Marathon. 

'Paverbs': Tales of the city Vol. 2

Us men at times don't understand the simple concept of "Women can do it to". We also think that women are such emotionally irrational creatures that they can't separate sex from actual feelings. Which is completely false; this is 2018 & the power is theirs. Sometimes she just needs some sex & you're just around & haven't talked yourself out the action.

This can sometimes last for months, hell I've even had situations like this last for almost a year. But don't get it twisted; she doesn't care about you. Unless you've had conversations with this woman that say otherwise, don't assume you're anything more.

Also, don't assume you can sex a woman into developing feelings for you. It's impossible & the quickest way to get your heart broken. The most painful relationship a man can be in is one with a woman who's single. Just appreciate the moments, appreciate the sex & don't overestimate your importance.

Let's first dive into what an "off night" is. The best way I can explain it is this: even Michael Jordan didn't drop 30 every night. Every now & then he had some 15-20 point games sprinkled in. That didn't happen often but it doesn't matter; the fact still remains it happened.

It's the same with women, especially the high maintenance bad ones in the city that seem so unattainable. On most nights, for you, they are but every now & then they'll make an exception. Usually, this exception has nothing to do with anything you actually did so don't sit back & assume you just have all the juice. No, you were just around; you were chosen & you didn't talk enough to fuck it up. You've probably been nothing but nice to her for the duration of time that you've known her & she just might need that energy in her life tonight.

It could be a multitude of things that cause this "off night" to happen but the top three reasons I've witnessed are:

  • An athlete or entertainer boyfriend being caught cheating so she's liable to engage in revenge sex.
  • The holiday season when the city kind of slows down a bit & most of the people who she is living that life with are back at home for the holidays.
  • The forever undefeated boredom.

    If she's that fire she's used to money, she's been around it & if you don't have it you won't keep her around. But every now & then when the stars align perfectly she can be yours, for one night only.

The City is a crazy place, everything seems so replaceable. So in turn everything is devalued, especially people & your relationships with them. Like I've mentioned before, a Hollywood three months is a normal year. In REAL life that's still only 90 days, but that's more than enough time to create a false reality about people. You see the people in this life usually aren't your friends, but when you're living at this speed it sure can seem like it. When you see somebody every night for three months when most people don't last a week, it can create a false sense of friendship.

Now you start calling people the homie whose last names you don't even know. Every memory you have with this person is past 9pm & jaded with drugs & alcohol. But you're so conditioned by the city you forgot that regular people don't live this way. It's like you guys have like your own little country club that only a few are privileged to. But these people, because they aren't your friends, aren't going to call you at 2pm to hang out & just talk.

But at this point, that's all you know because you don't meet regular people because they don't live like you. They can't stay up until 4am every night because they have work in the morning. So now you have to hit the streets every night because that's the only place you aren't lonely at, which is one reason why everybody says the city is so fake. It's not really that people are THAT much faker than anywhere else. It's that life moves at such a rapid speed you don't notice that they don't love you like that.

'Paverbs': Tales of the city

This is one a lot of people won't feel but I'm going to try to help you understand. When you living that life, especially in Hollywood, you meet so many people.

Think about it... let's say you go out four days a week. In those four days you might meet a group of women from out of the country, another group of women from out of town, a couple college girls as well as some girls who don't come out much but probably got drug out by their friends tonight.

The girls that you meet from out of town probably just want to party, so if they're in town for four days you might end up spending four straight nights with that group of girls. But they cycle out at the end of the week & a new roster comes in & it's the same thing rotated over & over again.

Also, people just fall off the map sometimes. People get girlfriends/boyfriends or maybe the occasional job or some people just end up moving back home because the city got too crazy. Everything is so fast so in three months the whole landscape of everything might have changed. The doormen at spots might be different, your favorite bartender might be gone... anything is possible. So a Hollywood 3 months is like a normal person's year because things switch over so fast when you are living at that speed. Everything & everyone, for the most part, is temporary.

Again, a Hollywood 3 months is like a normal year, so when you break that down 48 hours is like a week & half. If you meet a girl & she's living that life in a 48 hour span she probably meets about 10-20 guys & that's on a light week.

So from the time you take that IG or number down you are on the clock. I call it the "First 48". By noon of the next day if you haven't reached out to engage in some kind of conversation with her you're already losing. Also, you have to take into account that when you met her she was probably some type of intoxicated so she might not even remember that she met you in 48 hours.

You can play it how you want to play it but here's my advice: hit her up around Noon-2pm & tell her how nice it was to meet her & ask what she's getting into that night. See where she's going, make plans to pop up there, grab a drink, have a quick convo, keep it cool & then make plans for drinks for the following week.

Again, the first 48 hours is pivotal. How you play it will determine if you just see her around or if she's showing up with you.

First off, let's dive into who Tom Thibodeau is. He's the former coach of the Bulls during the D. Rose era & currently the coach of the Minnesota Timberwolves. He also should probably be in a jail for manslaugter for what he did to Luol Deng, Joakim Noah & D. Rose's knees but that's neither here no there. One thing he doesn't believe in is playing rookies. He values experience over potential in most situations.

Take that logic & apply it to women who just moved to the city. You can't date them, don't do it. They need to go through some stuff first before you can lock them down if that's your plan. LA is a crazy place: no matter where in America you come from there's nothing like it, especially for an attractive woman.

The allure is crazy & there's a 99% chance she's going to get some kind of caught up in it & she needs to. She needs to understand how the city works & get everything out of her system before you even attempt to put that type of life in front of her. Also the city has a way of making you the struggle version of yourself, especially if you have any type of self esteem issues which you don't need to be around for. Let her make her mistakes & go through what she has to go through & if it's real like that, ya'll will link up again when she's more settled in & has a little bit better understand of how the city works.

There's so much more that goes into a successful relationship besides having things in common with a person. When I was younger I thought similar interests were the end-all be-all but usually it isn't.

In most situations a person too much like you is actually a toxic situation. You don't need to date yourself; you need somebody to offset you & your faults & you need to be able to do the same with somebody else. Similar interests are cool but I'd rather have somebody around who forces me to be uncomfortable & puts me in those situations because that's how growth happens.

I think this tweet is pretty self-explanatory but I'll give you the story behind it.

Me & Scott were at this event & happened to meet these two women through one of my homies who were absolutely BEAUTIFUL. When they walked through the door I instantly knew they modeled & you know how much I love models. Usually I'm never bashful about shooting my shot but this time I backed off & kept it cool. Honestly, they looked like they were a little outside of my tax bracket at the moment.

Fast forward to the next day, one of my other homies calls me to recap the night. We get to talking about some of the girls who were there, then he mentioned them & then said they were going to come to the Doheny Room with us after, but she found somewhere to stay for the night....she's homeless.

There are so many stories like this around the city. So many women that you would never imagine would be living this way are living this way. The city is a crazy place.